Artist Statement

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When I was three years old my mother has shown me her ink illustrations of the Shakespeare’s sonnets. And I felt wrath. Not towards my mother but towards the self, and mostly my hands because they could not produce the images my mind envisioned; and my mom’s hands somehow could. What I saw in her drawings was invoking my emotions. I desired to learn to invoke emotions so I sought to spend my consecutive years trying ...

I admire and pursue realism. However, I allow my journey towards it to be meandering and long, leaving ample amount of space for idiosyncrasy of my own vision and handling of charcoal and paint. Above all I value the genuine search within the matter of drawing and painting. The work invokes when it is impregnated with questions answers to which sometimes lie beyond its boundaries. When questions are asked within the very fabric of the drawing or painting than it inspires and aspires, which is the ultimate goal. The most seemingly insignificant things, people, and circumstances can invoke the most noble emotions when portrayed with curiosity and search for answers. I try not to delve into complete realism prematurely, for I believe it is to come inevitably with time due to the increasing complexity of questions I acquire as I grow. The affirmation to my stylistic liberty I find in the route of artistic development of some of my most admired drawers and painters such as Lucian Freud, Egon Schiele and Jenny Seville. But ultimately the works of Katie Kollwitz, Degas and Maria Cassatt as well as Rembrandt, Titian, and Velazquez call me to stricter realist traditions.
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